The outrageous cost of a free press

Whilst a student of English Language and Literature in the late 1980s, this commentator spent several summers interning at advertising agencies and newspapers. The ad agency jobs involved first-hand experience of copywriting assignments and real campaigns. The newspaper jobs, on the other hand.. On walking into the offices of The Daily Express (more specifically, its short-lived and not especially appealing ‘dX’ magazine), for example, we were given just one instruction: “Who do you know that’s famous ? Go off and get an interview.” It would be fair to say that this did not exactly win us over to the ‘profession’. On entering the full-time job market in the recession of 1991, there turned out to be no positions available – at least not for this correspondent. But Fleet Street’s loss turned out to be the City’s dubious gain, and instead of a tyro Grub Street hack, a neophyte bond salesman was born.

The outrageous cost of a free press